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Check out the rest of our library for working with SMR premium vellum

Instructions for screenmaking with Vellum
When should you use vellum?
Printing on Vellum
Determining Correct Exposure for Vellum
Vellum Tips & Tricks

Printing on SMR Premium Vellum

Printing your screen printing designs on SMR Premium Vellum is almost as simple as printing a design from your computer on regular paper. These steps will help you get the most out of our product, and help you create fantastic designs for your customers. To print on SMR Premium Vellum, start by creating a design in the art software of your choice, such as Arts & Letters Express, CorelDraw or Illustrator. If this is a multi-color design, you will likely want to create alignment marks in the corners, and print labels for colors in the margins. Before you hit the print button, it is extremely helpful to adjust your printer setup parameters for optimum results:

Click here for Ink-Jet Print Instructions

For Laser Printers:

The biggest concern with laser printers and vellum is getting toner to completely meld on the page. Melding refers to getting the toner hot enough to melt and make toner particles stick to both the page and become cohesive with surrounding toner particles, creating an opaque design area. The portion of the laser printer that heats and compresses toner to accomplish the meld is called the fuser. Modern laser printers have fusers that can be adjusted, and the default settings for "plain paper" do not heat the fuser sufficiently to meld toner on vellum. It might seem illogical, but vellum is one of the densest substrates you might run through a printer. To achieve optimal results:

Step 1: Open the Printer setup dialog. Look for an area where you can choose paper parameters. The dialog for every printer is different, so what you see for your printer will not likely look exactly like the one pictured.

Note: Most printers can be set up automatically by Windows when you install the printer the first time. Most printers also come with an installation CD. The printer driver on the installation CD usually offers more controls than the default driver offered by Windows.

Step 2: Look for a list of paper "types" that your printer supports. Most printer drivers offer a drop-down list of papers supported by the printer. Choose the thickest or most heat-resistant setting you can find. You may need to experiment to find which one gets the fuser the hottest, but choices such as "Thick," "Cardstock," or "Rough" are usually good choices. "Transparency" might seem like a logical choice, but is actually a very cool setting, and it should be should be avoided.
Step 3: Look for a color management or print quality area in the print setup dialog. If a "brightness," "Contrast," or "Saturation" control exists, you will want to experiment with these controls to see how dark you can set your printer before "Toning" occurs. Toning is the term used to describe when unprinted areas get "grey" due to excessive toner broadcast.

Please be sure you look at the "Vellum Tips & Tricks" page for more tips on getting great images.

For Ink-Jet Printers:

The biggest concern with ink-jet printers and vellum is opacity. Because ink-jet technology uses a liquid ink to create an image, it is hard to get enough solids in the dried image to create an adequately opaque image. However, many printers expect much more opacity from their printer than is actually needed to use vellum successfully. Click here to see the section on determining optimum exposures for Vellum. To achieve optimal results with ink-jet printers:

Step 1: Open the Printer setup dialog. Look for an area where you can choose paper parameters. The dialog for every printer is different, so what you see for your printer will not likely look exactly like the one pictured.

Note: Most printers can be set up automatically by Windows when you install the printer the first time. Most printers also come with an installation CD. The printer driver on the installation CD usually offers more controls than the default driver offered by Windows.

Step 2: Look for a list of paper "types" that your printer supports. Most printer drivers offer a drop-down list of papers supported by the printer. Choose the most absorbent paper type you can find in the list. Even though vellum is not a very absorbent type of paper, you need to lay down as much ink as you can, and ink-jet printers partly determine the amount of ink they will deposit on the paper based upon the absorbency of the paper.

You may need to experiment to find which paper choice lays down the most ink without experiencing ink "running," but choices such as "Rough Cardstock," or "Plain Paper" are usually good choices. Many printers offer a "Vellum" setting. This may or may not be a good setting, depending on the printer manufacturer's view of vellum. Vellum is a very abused name for a paper substrate, and has come to refer to a large array of products.

Step 3: Look for a color management or print quality area in the print setup dialog. Most inkjet printers offer differing quality settings, commonly including "Draft" or "Fast"  through "Best" or "Highest Quality" settings. Choosing higher quality settings usually lays down more ink, and will usually slow the print head. In effect, you should get more ink, greater accuracy, and longer drying time allotments with higher print quality settings. With experimentation, you can find a setting that maximizes ink lay-down without "running."

Remember that Vellum is less absorbent, and will take longer to dry than regular paper. Make sure that sheets are allowed to dry in a horizontal position, and that subsequent sheets coming from the printer are not allowed to land on top of previously printed sheets.

Please be sure you look at the "Vellum Tips & Tricks" page for more tips.